SePRO honors SOLitude Lake Management professionals

SePRO honors SOLitude Lake Management professionals

Awards presented in a variety of aquatics management areas.

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December 14, 2016

Two aquatics management professionals from SOLitude Lake Management received Technology and Development Awards from SePRO. The SOLitude team members were honored with this award for their partnership with SePRO in conducting innovative research in the final phase of development of a new herbicide. Additionally, 11 water quality management professionals from SOLitude won Seeing is Believing Awards from SePRO. These awards recognize the highest standard of excellence in water quality treatment for lakes, ponds, stormwater basins or other waterbodies that have demonstrated the effectiveness of SePRO products in improving these aquatic ecosystems.

Marc Bellaud, President of SOLitude Lake Management, and Michael Lennon, Aquatic Specialist and Territory Leader, were named for the Technology and Development Award at the 2016 SePRO Preferred Applicator Seminar in November at the SePRO research and training center in Whitakers, N.C. They were recognized for their help in coordinating field trials of a new herbicide with the New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services and SePRO to evaluate its potential as a management option for control of non-native variable watermilfoil. SOLitude contributed to bringing this breakthrough technology to the aquatics industry by assisting in site identification and state permitting, and performing the herbicide application.

The 11 SOLitude professionals named for the “Seeing is Believing” awards were also honored at the 2016 SePRO Preferred Applicator Seminar. Each award submission consisted of a case study documenting a technical program for nuisance aquatic weed and/or algae control with before and after photos and a detailed treatment summary for the waterbody including treatment objectives, treatment and waterbody specifics, water quality data, project results and client satisfaction.

A sample of case study submissions which resulted in these honors are as follows:

Josh Perry, environmental scientist, for the successful treatment of filamentous algae blooms in an eight-acre public park pond in Shrewsbury, Mass., that receives a significant amount of fertilizer runoff and has historically been plagued by severe algae blooms.

J. Wesley Allen, environmental scientist and territory leader, and Gavin Ferris, Ecologist, for their successful treatment of fragrant white water-lily in a community’s 0.5 acre stormwater pond in Bel Air, Md., with 100 percent aquatic weed coverage.

Shannon Junior, aquatic ecologist and senior business development consultant, for the successful treatment of a 0.6 acre private horse farm pond in Brentsville, Va., to reduce the thick growth of duckweed, watershield and bladderwort.

Jason Luce, lake management scientist and certified lake manager, for the successful treatment of dense cladophora algae, as well as slender pondweed growth and filamentous algae growth, in a 1.2-acre community pond in Aberdeen, Md.

Kyle Finerfrock, environmental scientist, for the successful treatment of parrot feather, a nuisance aquatic weed which was limiting recreational use in a community’s 2.75-acre pond in Mineral, Va.

Greg Blackham, aquatic specialist, for the successful treatment of a four-acre stormwater pond, in Lewes, Del., that was plagued with spirogyra and pithophora algae blooms and low dissolved oxygen.

Hunter Poland, environmental scientist, for the successful treatment of persistent blue-green algae growth which was making fishing, kayaking and swimming nearly impossible in a 6.9-acre private pond in Erie, Pa.

Doug Hawpe, natural resource specialist, for the successful treatment of blue-green algae in a Homeowners’ Association’s 0.45-acre stormwater pond in Mount Vernon, Va.

Derek Johnson, certified lake manager and lake management scientist, for the successful treatment of a 0.2 acre private pond in Richmond, Va., with 100 percent planktonic algae coverage.

Parker Hurst, wildlife and fisheries biologist, for the successful treatment of filamentous algae growth in a Homeowners’ Association’s 1.1 acre stormwater pond in Hendersonville, Tenn.